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P.O. Box 35
Philomath, OR 97370
541.929.6230
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Benton County Historical Timeline: 1920s


1920

Corvallis population: 5,752; Benton County: 13,744.

   

1920

The "wheat slump of 1920" closes the Fischer Brothers Milling Company.

   

1920

The number of dairy cows in the county (8,064) outnumber the number of beef cattle (2,630) as the dairy industry replaces cattle ranching.

   

1920

From 1920 to 1930, the population of Corvallis increases 31 percent.

   

1920

During the 1920s, the development of the area known as south Corvallis takes place on the south side of the Mary's River.

   

1920-1930

By the 1920s, the timber industry in Benton County is cutting more timber (60 million board feet) than it produces in new growth (40 million board feet).

   

1921

Paved road reaches Monroe from the north Benton County line.

   

1921

The Lincoln Tract is added in south Corvallis.

   

1921

The Hillcrest Addition is platted.

   

1921

OAC's football stadium, constructed in 1913, is christened Bell Field, named for J.R.N. Bell, a local Methodist minister who, by this point in his life, is considered to be the greatest OAC athletic booster of his generation. Sometimes nicknamed the "Little Beaver Mascot," or just "Beaver Mascot," he is seriously ill the day of the ceremony and does not attend. (See also 1907 and 1913)

   

1921

One hundred seventy-three new residences are built in Corvallis.

   

1921

The Blue Mouse Theater is opened on North Street in a building built by the Oddfellows.

   

1922

The Whiteside Theatre is built by George and Samuel Whiteside on the northeast corner of Fourth and Madison streets. The cost is $100,000, a huge sum for the times.

c. 1925.  Printed on the postcard on the bottom left is the following: Color lantern slide, circa 1940 (probably 1941), depicting main facade of Whiteside Theatre.    

1922

Sam H. Moore opens the Benton County Hatchery on the corner of Eleventh and Taylor streets, at that time the largest electric hatchery on the west coast.

   

1922

Nineteen new buildings are added to the Corvallis business district, including the Weigand Block (Second Street, between Monroe and Jackson), the Eberting Building (same location), the Beaver Laundry Building (just to the north), the Smith-Allen-Rennie Building (Third and Madison), the Pulley-Darling-Hyde-Thatcher buildings (west side of Third between Madison and Monroe), the Johnson Porter Building (for the Pacific Telephone Company on the southwest corner of Third and Monroe)), and the Ball Building on the northwest corner of Third and Jefferson.

   

1922

KOAC radio is established as KFDJ.

   

1922

Corvallis sees the appearance of its first apartment buildings made of brick, concrete, and stone, including the Beaver Apartments on north Second Street, the Fairview Apartments at Twelfth and Van Buren streets, the Ball Apartments in the Ball Building on Third and Jefferson, and the Schneider Apartments on 26th and Arnold Way.

   

1922

One hundred twenty-five new residences are constructed in Corvallis.

   

1922

Linus Pauling graduates from Oregon Agricultural College. He will go on to become one of the seminal scientists of the twentieth century and the only person in history to win two unshared Nobel Prizes.

   

1923

Carver Tracts are added in south Corvallis, Oregon.

   

1923

OAC abolishes all academic work not of college standing.

   

1924

The Corvallis City Improvement League plants trees through the community.

   

1924

The last of the ramshackle old barns, sheds, and lop-sided lean-to's that once were interspersed among business houses along Second and Third streets between Van Buren and Washington streets is torn down, making way for a variety of modern business structures, including the Benton Hotel and the Elks Temple.

   

1924

The Memorial Union at Oregon Agricultural College is organized and incorporated.

   

1924

OSC wrestler Robin Reed wins the gold medal at the Paris Olympics.

   

1924

Fischer Brothers Milling Company reopens with an emphasis on feed and seed rather than flour.

   

1925

Ernest Wiegand, a professor of horticulture at OAC, adds calcium salts to cherry brine to perfect the modern process for making maraschino cherries. It is a myth that the maraschino cherry was invented at Oregon State University since the product had been around for a long time prior to Wiegand's arrival at Oregon Agricultural College in 1919.

   

1925

Hotel Benton is built on the southwest corner of Fourth and Monroe streets.

Corvallis' Hotel Benton photo circa 1925 Corvallis, Oregon's Hotel Benton photo appx. 1983    

1925

First Women's Day organized at OAC. It becomes "Women's Weekend in 1933 and "Mother's Weekend" in 1947.

   

1925

Radio station KFDJ is licensed as KOAC and its power is boosted to 500 watts.

   

1925

Building permits are required for the first time in Corvallis.

   

1925

Siletz agency closes.

   

1925

Corvallis hires its first city planner, A.D. Taylor. Among other things, he recommends that the riverfront be acquired by the city and developed into a park.

   

1925

OAC's School of Forestry purchases 80 acres north of Lewisburg that will eventually become OSU's Peavy Arboretum.

   

1925

Notre Dame's legendary football coach Knute Rockne arrives in Corvallis to teach his then-famous "Rockne Method" football course as a summer faculty member at Oregon Agricultural College. He has a special affinity for OAC because of his friendship with Beaver Head Football Coach Paul Schissler. He will return each of the next three years (1926-28) to do the same, much to the delight of the college community, townspeople, and Dean Ellwood Smith, head of the OAC School of Basic Arts and Sciences and director of the summer session.

   

1925

The Crees Building is constructed downtown on the west side of Third Street between Madison and Jefferson streets.

Third Street Looking North from Jefferson Avenue (undated photo) McGregor's, in the Crees Building, Corvallis, Oregon.  Undated photo.    

1926

The Gazette-Times newspaper moves into a new building at the southwest corner of Third and Jefferson.

Gazette-Times Corvallis building.  Undated photo    

1926

The Women's Building at Oregon Agricultural College is erected.

Oregon Agricultural College (OAC), ca. 1928 OAC Women's Building under construction, ca. 1928    

1926

Lilly Acres is added in south Corvallis.

   

1927

The wood-frame Occidental Hotel building at the southeast corner of Second and Madison streets is replaced by the Corvallis Hotel.

Occidental Hotel and streetcar, in the intersection of Madison Avenue and Second Street, circa 1890.    

1927

Steel pipes replace wooden water pipes from Marys Peak watershed.

   

1927

Oregon Agricultural College becomes Oregon State Agricultural College.

   

1928

Railroad passenger service between Corvallis and Yaquina Bay is discontinued.

   

1928

The Memorial Union building and Weatherford Hall are completed on the OSAC campus.

Memorial Union, Corvallis, Oregon Weatherford Hall, Corvallis, Oregon    

1928

Trucks and automobiles have now fully eclipsed the railroad as the chief means of passenger and freight service between Benton County and the rest of the state.

   

1929

By the dawn of the Great Depression, the three largest employers in Benton County were agriculture, education, and timber.

   

1929

Owing to financial difficulties, Philomath College closes its doors for the upcoming school year. The collapse of the stock market in the fall and the Great Depression that follows deal a final blow to the institution; it never reopened.

   

 

Return to Timeline Homepage

1840 | 1850 | 1860 | 1870 | 1880 | 1890

1900 | 1910 | 1920 | 1930 | 1940 | 1950 |1960 | 1970 | 1980 | 1990 | 2000

 

 

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© 2008 - 2014 Benton County Historical Society & Museum
Philomath, Oregon
The Benton County Historical Society is a nonprofit corporation that operates museum facilities for the preservation of history and culture.  Its mission is to:

  1. Preserve the material and intellectual culture of Benton County, Oregon, by acquiring and caring for significant collections that illustrate and interpret the history of the area and its relationship to the world;
  2. Enrich people's lives through exhibitions and educational programs.